Can Dogs Eat Chicken Liver? (Yes, Here’s How)

Chicken liver is a very healthy option for dogs and can be given to your pet either cooked or raw. Liver is a cheap meat that contains many beneficial vitamins and minerals. It can be given to your dog as a treat or as part of a raw food diet.

If you’re thinking of feeding liver to your dog, read on. This article will answer the question ‘Can dogs eat chicken liver?’

can dogs eat chicken liver

 

Can I give my dog chicken liver?

Chicken liver is often listed as an ingredient in commercial dog foods. It’s very healthy and will provide your pet with many nutritional benefits. Many dog owners opt to feed their pet a raw or homemade diet and include chicken liver in their pet’s meals.

If you’re thinking of dramatically changing your dog’s diet, you should first seek advice from your vet. This is particularly important if your dog is older or has any pre-diagnosed health conditions.

Even if you’re not planning a diet overhaul for your dog, you may like to give him some liver every now and again as a treat. Chicken liver is a healthy option as long as it’s fed to your pet in small quantities.

 

The benefits of chicken liver for dogs

can i give my dog chicken liver

Chicken liver is a very healthy option for canines as it’s high in lean protein. All dogs should eat lots of protein as this will help them stay in top condition. It also contains beneficial fat and vitamin A, which will improve the condition of your pet’s coat and skin. Vitamin A is also excellent for eye health.

As chicken liver has a high-fat content, it’s great for underweight dogs. It’s also a particularly good choice for growing puppies and young dogs as it will help them grow up to be strong and healthy.

 

Feeding chicken liver to your dog

You can add either raw or cooked chicken to your dog’s diet. Many people, vets included, question whether it’s sensible to give dogs raw chicken liver. There are concerns that raw meat can carry bacteria. However, many vets argue that wolves and other wild dogs eat raw meat, and adding raw chicken liver has many benefits. Wild dogs eat every piece of their kill, including the internal organs.

If you decide to give your pet some chicken liver, you should ensure that your dog doesn’t consume more than food intake as liver. If your dog’s regular food contains liver, you should take this into account when calculating how much your pet can eat. Only give your dog additional liver once or twice weekly. Cooked or dried chicken liver is a great option, and these can be used as a treat while training.

If you decide to give your dog cooked liver, ensure that you cook it as plainly as possible. Cook the liver especially for your dog, rather than feeding him liver from your plate. When cooking liver for a dog, don’t add any additional ingredients such as salt, seasoning, or oil.

Dogs can also eat other parts of the chicken, such as their necks or feet.

 

The risks of chicken liver

can dogs eat raw chicken liver

Chicken liver is a meat that contains high amounts of fat and can cause weight gain in dogs. If your dog is already overweight, you should avoid giving him chicken liver. Chicken liver can also cause stomach issues if your dog has too much at once. Your dog may suffer from a sore stomach and loose stools. It’s, therefore, best to only give your pet a small amount of liver.

Dogs that eat too much chicken liver are also at risk of overdosing on vitamin A; this is a condition known as hypervitaminosis, which in the worse cases can be life-threatening. This condition causes stomach problems and breathing difficulties and may prove to be fatal.

 

Conclusion

There are many health benefits of giving chicken liver to your dog. Liver is fatty and can help underweight dogs to put on weight and improve their health. It can also be used to improve skin conditions and make your dog’s fur glossy and healthy-looking.

However, you should be careful not to give your dog too much chicken liver as this can cause your pet to suffer from an overdose of vitamin A, which can be life-threatening.